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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Policy of Railroad Land Grants found in the catalog.

The Policy of Railroad Land Grants

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Published by s.n .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23456633M
OCLC/WorldCa26367297

  In total, the Northern Pacific Railroad received land grants totaling 45 million acres, over double what any other transcontinental line received. million of these were in North Dakota, or approximately per cent of the land area in the entire state. Northern Pacific Railroad’s Land Grant Checkerboard Across North Dakota. Attempts by the use of econometrics to determine the values of railroad land grants of the 19th century to the railroads and to society as a whole. The author summarizes and criticizes previous treatments of this subject and then discusses his own findings.

Book Land and Law in the Age of Enterprise: A Legal History of Railroad Land Grants in the Pacific Northwest, () Sean M Kammer, University of South Dakota School of Law; Link Abstract. Federal land subsidies to railroad corporations comprised an important part of the federal government’s policies towards its western land domain. of Land Grants THE federal policy of granting land in aid of railroad construc-tion in the mid-nineteenth century has been the focus of many heated discussions. Both praised and attacked by contempo-raries, it has remained a lively issue in the pages of history books and in journal articles. Several 'land-grant legends" have developed, re-.

But federal policy shifted in , when Congress authorized a federal grant of some million acres of public land to the states of Illinois, Mississippi, and Alabama to help promote and finance railroad construction. Specifically, the grant allocated a two-hundred-foot right-of-way corridor, and alternating parcels of land on either side. Railroad land Grants. gov't gave alternating squares of land to the railroad. Gov't benefited with westward expansion (railroad attracted people), railroad benefited with more land. This was a book written by Carnegie that described the responsibility of the rich to be philanthropists. This softened the harshness of Social Darwinism as well.


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The Policy of Railroad Land Grants Download PDF EPUB FB2

Description. Railroads and Land Grant Policy: A Study in Government Intervention attempts to replace a major part of the railroad land grant legend (according to which the granting of federal and state land to private railroad firms benefitted these firms more than it contributed to society as a whole) with some real numbers and analysis.

Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Skip to main content. The Policy of Railroad Land Grants by Edward Thomas Peters. Publication date Publisher s.n Collection americana Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of unknown library LanguagePages:   Description.

Railroads and Land Grant Policy: A Study in Government Intervention attempts to replace a major part of the railroad land grant legend (according to which the granting of The Policy of Railroad Land Grants book and state land to private railroad firms benefitted these firms more than it contributed to society as a whole) with some real numbers and Edition: 1.

Railroad land grants: Paid for in full / by Frank N. Wilner [Wilner, Frank N] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Railroad land grants: Paid for in full / by Frank N. WilnerAuthor: Frank N Wilner. This noteworthy book deals with federal land grants made from the public domain to a number of states to build transcontinental railroads during the nineteenth century.

The railroad land grants were a significant intervention by the government in the operation of the economy and are frequently viewed as a simple matter of government gifts to business.

Railroads and Land Grant Policy: A Study in Government Intervention attempts to replace a major part of the railroad land grant legend (according to which the granting of federal and state land to private railroad firms benefitted these firms more than it contributed to society as a whole) with some real numbers and analysis.

See, for example, Norris, Frank, The Octopus: A Story of California (New York: Doubleday, Page & Co., ).See also Kammer, Sean M., “ No Trespassing: Railroad Land Grants, the Right of Exclusion, and the Origins of Federal Forest Conservation,” North Dakota Law Review 90 (): 90 (“By the end of the nineteenth century, railroads had come to be seen not only as manifestations of.

Land Grants. The second half of the nineteenth century was the era of railroad land grants. Between and extensive cessions of public lands were made to states and to railroad companies to promote railroad construction.[] Usually the companies received from the federal government, in twenty- or fifty-mile strips, alternate sections of public land for each mile of track that was built.

Railroad land grants Even after years, political opponents and commentators still vilify land grants made to railroads. If a century and a half is not sufficient time to remove objections, minds are not suddenly going to start changing now. In fact, Richard White's book, Railroaded (ISBN ) retraced the subject again in   gress viewed railroad right-of-way grants as separate from its railroad land subsidy grants, it did not intend to change rights-of-way in when it ceased granting land subsi-dies.

The Solicitor General and the Supreme Court erred in by conflating the two types of grants and misreading the relevant legislative history. To facilitate the discussion of the issues raised by the above situations, this paper is divided into three main areas of discussion: mineral estate obtained from the federal government by a patent issued in satisfaction of the grant of land in aid of construction of a railroad, herein referred to as grant lands; mineral substances.

Railroad Land Grant Patents, United States to Minnesota, (Microfilm Reel 59) The land grants represented by these patents were authorized by the United States Congress to aid designated railroad companies in construction of their lines.

Upon completion of. Records of unidentified or various land offices, including tract books, ; land grant files, ; enlarged homestead designations, ; and stockraising designations, Maps ( items, in Denver): Wyoming oil fields, (21 items). Right-of-way and railroad land grant plats, ( items).

SEE ALSO Railroad Land Grants The U.S. federal government has at times encouraged the development of roads, canals, and railroads when it was beneficial to the nation's expansion. When the U.S. government decided a transcontinental railroad was necessary, it stimulated private industry to build one.

The Pacific Railroad Acts of were a series of acts of Congress that promoted the construction of a "transcontinental railroad" (the Pacific Railroad) in the United States through authorizing the issuance of government bonds and the grants of land to railroad companies.

The War Department under then Secretary of War Jefferson Davis was authorized by the Congress in to conduct surveys. Maps showing the connections of the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad and its land grant. Two maps on 1 sheet. Main map shows entire United States with its railroad system and emphasizes the main line.

Secondary map shows land grants. Chartered in and opened in free resources permeated federal land policy and its often-lax administration, using Garret Hardin’s “tragedy of the commons” model as its framework.

Then, Section Three explores the ironic role of railroad companies in confronting the tradition of free resources, even though they were prime beneficiaries of it. While the land grants may not have been all bad, most scholars take a more negative, or more nuanced, view.

The railroads that would become the Burlington system received more than million acres of federal land grants:to the Hannibal & St. Joseph in ; aboutto the Burlington & Missouri River Rail Road in ; and about.

railroad land grants and the shift in the public and the Supreme Court’s attitudes MISS. VALLEY HIST. REV. 27, 38 () (“The opponents of land grants found it necessary throughout the decade of the seventies to prevent further raids on the public domain and the.

Land Grants and Railroad Entrepreneurship THE effects of Federal and state land-grant policies on railroad in-vestment, railroad policy, and regional economic development are too varied to be treated in less than a volume.

And such a book would require much research that has not as. 3, tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located.

The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds. 16 Land grants, with the alternate acreage provision, might still allow for the correct output, with taxpayers obtaining part of the “benefits.” There is a problem in evaluating the railroad pricing policy to maximize profits when the grant is for only one-half the adjacent land and when price discrimination is by:   To encourage settlement of large tracts of land, many colonies and states allowed land speculators, often organized as land companies, to purchase large tracts of land for resale to settlers.

Records of these transactions may be difficult to obtain. They may have remained in private possession, or have been deposited in a state, local, or private archives or historical society.